What we read this week (6 July 2018)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ’s Digital Group members.

Publishing and Open Science

Slate discuss the impact of Facebook’s retreat from the news business.

There’s a great quote in this article:

“The internet is a completely different place every 18 months, and that’s been true since we launched in 1996,”

Continue reading “What we read this week (6 July 2018)”

Digiday Research: Where publishers get their video revenues

At the Digiday Video Summit last month in Scottsdale, Arizona, we sat down with 51 publisher executives to learn about social platforms’ contributions to their video revenues. Check out our research on publishers’ growing concerns about their ability to monetize content for over-the-top services here. Learn more about our upcoming events here. Continue reading “Digiday Research: Where publishers get their video revenues”

How Viacom uses artificial intelligence to predict the success of its social campaigns

To eliminate some of the guesswork from its social media campaigns, Viacom has turned to machines.

Over the past year, a seven-person data science team in Viacom’s ad sales group has been building a pipeline to collect near-real time information about how its social media posts perform. This way, the entertainment giant can predict how many social posts it will need to reach audience goals and what kinds of posts to use in each campaign. Continue reading “How Viacom uses artificial intelligence to predict the success of its social campaigns”

Subscription publishers (still) have platform problems

Platforms played integral roles in helping publishers scale audiences. Now, they’re helping with publishers’ subscription ambitions, with new product features and programs to educate publishers just starting to pursue consumer revenue.

While publishers are heartened by these steps, many are wary. Not only do platforms have a history of changing their minds about how their products work, they are also limited in their ability to help publishers’ subscription efforts. Here is a rundown of what the platforms have done and the gripes that publishers still have with them. Continue reading “Subscription publishers (still) have platform problems”

Grow the pie: Podcast revenue seems to be growing fast enough for everyone to get a slice

To absolutely no one’s surprise, I agree with this. Kafka articulated something I’ve been trying to say whenever I’ve written about the related issue of programmatic podcast advertising — but obviously, a whole lot better than I ever could — which is to essentially point out that rapid growth, as well as the implementation of technology and practices that push hard for rapid growth, often come at the expense of quality and general thoughtfulness of a space.

I’ve come to feel about podcasting the way I’ve long felt about a certain up-and-coming city in the American inter-mountain west (which will remain nameless for reasons that will become clear): I love it a whole ton, and I love that loads more people are beginning to love it too, but maybe we should start shit-talking the place before the tourists get here and drive the market out of whack. Continue reading “Grow the pie: Podcast revenue seems to be growing fast enough for everyone to get a slice”

As @risj_oxford prepares to launch the 2018 Digital News Report, it seems a good time to revisit Journalism, Media and Technology Trends and Predictions, by @nicnewman January 2018,… How is it going so far?

As prepares to launch the 2018 Digital News Report, it seems a good time to revisit Journalism, Media and Technology Trends and Predictions, by January 2018,… How is it going so far? Which trends are here to stay? https://reutersinstitute.politics.ox.ac.uk/our-research/journalism-media-and-technology-trends-and-predictions-2018 …

Annotations are an easy way to Show Your Work

Journalists are increasingly being asked to show their work. Politifact does it like this. This is great! The more citation of sources, the better. If I want to check those sources, though, I often wind up spending a lot of time searching with cited articles to find passages cited implicitly but not explicitly. If those passages are marked using annotations, the method I’ll describe here can streamline the reader’s experience. Continue reading “Annotations are an easy way to Show Your Work”

European news sites are among the worst offenders when it comes to third-party cookies and content

The forthcoming General Data Protection Regulation on May 25 is pushing publishers to take a hard look at just how dependent their outlets have become on cookies third-party trackers they load on their own sites in order to collect data from their visitors.

News sites actually load more third-party content and set more third-party cookies than other top websites, according to a new study of websites across seven European countries from the Reuters Institute. Continue reading “European news sites are among the worst offenders when it comes to third-party cookies and content”

A new app for The Economist

Serving readers the stories they want, when and how they want them

I am delighted to tell you about the new mobile app for The Economist, which we have just released for iPhone and iPad. It is the first major change to The Economist on mobile in almost eight years: when the original Digital Editions Economist app was released in 2010 the iPad was brand new, and at that stage the success of the iPhone and its app ecosystem was not yet guaranteed. Continue reading “A new app for The Economist”

How The Economist’s new app tries to keep people from unsubscribing

To grow reader revenue, publishers are increasingly putting customers at the center of their organizations to drive subscriptions and retention.

For the past eight months, The Economist has worked to drive retention, as it’s cheaper to keep readers than to acquire new ones. Case in point is its new Economist app, which went live May 2 and is free to download, but requires a subscription to access articles. Continue reading “How The Economist’s new app tries to keep people from unsubscribing”

Understanding the implications of Open Citations — how far along are we?

Understanding the implications of Open Citations — how far along are we?

The academic discovery space seems to be buzzing again. This space has become relatively stable after the introduction and maturity of Web Scale Discovery between 2009–2013, but things seem to be hotting up once again. Continue reading “Understanding the implications of Open Citations — how far along are we?”

Digiday Research: Voice is a low priority for marketers

At the Digiday AI Marketing Summit this month in Santa Barbara, California, we spoke with leaders from 37 companies interested in applying artificial intelligence to marketing and learned about their plans for voice marketing. Check out our earlier research on AI’s potential to replace media buyers here. Learn more about our upcoming events here. Continue reading “Digiday Research: Voice is a low priority for marketers”

What we read this week (27 April 2018)

Welcome to Things we read this week, a weekly post featuring articles from around the internet recommended by BMJ’s Digital Group members. These are articles we’ve read and liked, things that made us think and things we couldn’t stop talking about. It’s an eclectic mix this week:

Publishing:

We’re really interested to see how the FT’s experiment with :CRUX to use Knowledge Acquisition as an approach to content recommendation will work out. We could see this approach working well for some of our audience segments.

Continue reading “What we read this week (27 April 2018)”

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